Learn to Crochet.

A Law of a Circle for Crocheting in Rounds.


To learn to crochet in rounds doesn't necessarily mean that we are going to study how to make a circle. Crocheting in rounds means that you don't need to turn the work at the end of the row in order to position your hook at the beginning of a new row. Each round is a row worked until it meets itself. Once it happened, you have to join the end of the row to its beginning. How? You have to use a slip stitch.

Learn to Crochet a Slip Stitch.

How to crochet a slip stitch.

Step 1: To join the end of the row to its beginning, insert the hook into the first stitch of the row from front to back. Wrap the yarn over the hook from back to front (see illustration).

Step 2: In one motion draw the yarn through the stitch and through the loop on the hook. Slip stitch is made.

Once you have an idea about crocheting in a round, you can crochet a triangle, square, hexagon, or octagon by varying the points of increases on each round. Why and how do we need to make all those increases?

It is just a matter of pure geometry. A chart shows four rounds (1st and 3rd - in black, 2nd and 4th - in red) total. You can see that each next round has a diameter greater than a previous one.

Learn to crochet in rounds.

To increase a diameter of a new round, we have to add stitches to each new round. It will keep a circle flat. A detailed explanation about reading charts, while crocheting in rounds can be found at the Crochet in Rounds page.

How many increases should we make in each row? As usually, there are a few RIGHT solutions for the same problem. Choose the one you like the best. Let's learn to crochet a circle first.

Learn to crochet a flat circle. Variant # 1.

Below is a table, which presents a simple Law of a Circle data, to follow. It will keep your circle flat. A project begins with a ring of chain stitches. How many of them should be made? Pattern usually tells you. If you don't have any pattern description, just follow the table data. Keep in mind, that the taller the stitch is you use, the more stitches necessary for ease of working. But it is not critical.

Increase for keeping a flat circle.

Round 1. Make a chain for height to start the next round (Column #3). Count that as first stitch. Crochet as many stitches in a ring as many of them are shown in the last column. (To add in each round). Slip stitch to join.

Round 2. Make a chain for height to start the round. Count that as first stitch. Total number of stitches which has to be added depends upon the type of stitch you crochet. For any type of stitches, their number has to be doubled to compare to the first circle: work two stitches in every stitch of the first round. Slip stitch to join.

Round 3 and every next round. Make a chain for height to start the round. Number of stitches to be added in a round is shown in the last column. Increases have to be evenly distributed among the stitches of the previous round. For example, for the third row: *work two stitches in the first stitch, than work one stitch in each of the next two stitches *, repeat from * to * to the end of the row. Slip stitch to join.

Learn to crochet a flat circle. Variant #2.

Here, is a slightly different approach to crocheting a circle. There are no too many differences between both variants. Which one to choose is only a matter of your preferences. This method works for single, double, and treble crochet. Let's learn to crochet a circle, using a single crochet stitch.

Make a ring using 3 or more chain stitches, slip stitch to join.

Round 1. Make 1 chain for height to start the next round. Count that as first stitch. Make, for example, 8 single crochets total over the ring. Slip stitch to join.

Round 2. Make 1 chain for height. Count that as first stitch. Work two stitches in every stitch in the round. Slip stitch to join. There will be 16 stitches total in the round.

Round 3. Make 1 chain for height. Count that as first stitch. *Work two stitches in the first stitch, one in the second stitch", repeat from * to * to the end of the row. Slip stitch to join. There will be 24 stitches in the 3rd round.

Round 4. Make 1 chain for height. Count that as first stitch. *Work two stitches in the first stitch, than work one stitch in each of the next two stitches *, repeat from * to * to the end of the row. Slip stitch to join. There will be 32 stitches in the 4th round.

Round 5. Make 1 chain for height. Count that as first stitch. *Work two stitches in the first stitch, than work one stitch in each of the next three stitches *, repeat from * to * to the end of the row. Slip stitch to join. There will be 40 stitches in the 3rd round.

Round 5. Make 1 chain for height. Count that as first stitch. *Work two stitches in the first stitch, than work one stitch in each of the next four stitches *, repeat from * to * to the end of the row. Slip stitch to join. There will be 48 stitches in the 3rd round.

Additional Rounds: Here is a trick: each increase is done by making 2 single stitches in one stitch. Round 3 has 1 single stitch between increases. Round 4 has 2 single stitches between increases. Round 5 has 3 single stitches between increases. To keep your circle flat, each new round has to have 1 extra single stitch between increases.

The best way to learn to crochet your first circle is the practice, of course. Here, is a video and additional explanation which show you how to crochet a round using double crochet stitches.



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Lace Leaf Fall. Issue # 165.

Modern Russian language crochet magazine Duplet. with a lot of patterns and pictures (color and BW). FREE shipping worldwide! Look inside, video tour is attached!

November 2014 issue:

180 symbolic crochet patterns, 7 illustrated master-classes. New designs: Mashes for assembling motifs and Irish Crochet patterns elements.