Granite Lace Knitting Stitch: Step-by-Step Tutorial

Granite Lace Knitting Stitch, by Janice   |Published 02-13-2024

The Granite Lace Knitting Stitch is an intriguing and sophisticated knitting pattern, often admired for its distinctive combination of complexity and elegance. The fabric produced is lacy and that criss-cross design is reminisce of granite rock. 

It is slightly more challenging than the basic stitches because it introduces two new techniques, knit back and forth and knit two together, it's not as difficult as it looks.   The row of decreases followed by a row of increases creates the lacy design.

Perfect for advanced knitters seeking to explore more innovative and expressive needlework or intermediate ones wanting to step up their game, Granite Lace Stitch lends itself wonderfully to a variety of projects like shawls, scarves, or stoles.

Skill Level

Skill level easy per the Craft Yarn Council

This pattern is considered Easy because it does have two skills (knit front and back) and (knit two together) are above the basic level.

Abbreviations Used

K - Knit

P - Purl

K2tog - Knit two together

KFB - Knit Front and back

CO - Cast On

BO - Bind off

RS - Right Side

WS - Wrong Side

Skills Needed

  • How to make the knit stitch
  • How to make the purl stitch
  • How to cast on
  • How to bind off
  • How to make K2Tog (knit two together) - see below
  • How to do Kfb (knit front and back) - see below

Notes About the

  • All instructions are written in US Terms.
  • K2Tog is a single stitch decrease.  To make this, with the yarn in back, insert the right knitting needle through the first TWO stitches on the left knitting needle as you would if you were only knitting one stitch.  Wrap the yarn around the needle and pull through both stitches.  pull through both stitches.

How to Make a K2Tog

First of a five part tutorial on how to make the knit two togetherStep One: Insert the right knitting needle through the first TWO stitches on the left knitting needle as you would if you were only knitting one stitch.
Part 2 of a five part series on how to make the knit two together knitting techniqueStep Two: Wrap the yarn around the needle as if making a knit stitch.
Part 3 of a five part series on how to make the knit two together knit decrease stitch.Step Three: Pull through both stitches.
Step 4 tutorial for the knit two together knit decrease.Step Four: Pull through both stitches, so you end up with one stitch from two stitches (one knit decrease).
Step 5 of a five part series on how to make the Knit two together knitting decrease.Step Five: For the Granite Lace Stitch, row two reduces by half the number of stitches on the needle.
  • KFB: This stands for knit front and back and is a knitting increase. To make the KFB, insert the right needle into the next stitch on the left needle. Wrap the yarn around the needle and pull through but do not slide the stitch off the needle.  Now, insert the right needle into the back of the same stitch and wrap yarn around needle.  Pull through and slide stitch off of the needle.  This creates two stitches were there once was one.

How to Make the KFB (Knit, Front and Back

Step one of a series of a tutorial on how to make the Knit Front Back Knit IncreasedStep One: Insert the right needle into the next stitch on the left needle.
Step two of a series of tutorials of how to make the knit front and back knit increaseStep Two: Wrap the yarn around the needle to make a knit stitch.
Step 3 of a six part tutorial on how to make the KFBStep Three: Pull through but do not remove the stitch from the left needle.
Step Four of the step-by-step tutorial on how to do the KFB (knit, front, back)Step Four: Insert the right needle into the back loop of the same stitch.
Step five of the step-by-step tutorial on how to make the KFB (knit, front, back)Step Five: Yarn over the needle and pull through.
The last step of a step-by-step tutorial on how to do the KFB (knit front back)Step Six: Remove stitches from the left needle onto the right needle. You will now have two stitches where there used to be one. (Knitting Increase)

Is This Pattern Reversible?

This pattern is not reversible.  The reverse side appears more like the reverse side of a stockinette stitch.

Right side showing of the granite lace knitting stitche pattern.Granite Lace Knitting Stitch Pattern: Right Side
Wrong Side Showing of the Granite knit stitch patternGranite Lace Knitting Stitch Pattern: Wrong Side

Supplies Needed For This Tutorial

You will need:

  • Yarn and appropriated sized needles
  • Scissors
  • Tapestry needle for weaving in end.

Written Directions

Cast on an Even Number of Stitches.

1.  Row 1:  (RS).  Knit across row.

2.  Row 2:  (WS).  *K2Tog* across row.

3.  Row 3:  *KFB* across row.

4.  Row 4:  Purl across row.

Continue these four rows until you reach your desired length.  Bind off and weave in ends.

Learn How to Read Knitting Stitch Charts

As you progress in your knitting journey, you will encounter knitting charts to help decipher or enhance written instructions.  This stitch pattern is easy and a knitting chart is really not necessary, but it is never too early to learn how to read a knitting charts.

Granite Lace Knitting Stitch

Granite Lace Stitch knitting chart

What Can You Make With This Stitch

This stitch pattern works nicely in scarves, shawls and blankets, projects where you want a lot of drape.  I think it would make a lovely table runner or individual placemats.

Granite Lace Knitting Stitches:  Pin for Future Reference

The granite lace knitting stitch pattern worked in a cream color acrylic is worked into a pin imageGranite Lace Knitting Stitch Pin Image

Conclusion

In conclusion, mastering the granite lace stitch requires eagle-eyed focus and practice. Once you have memorized the four row repeat, it will go quickly.   

An exquisite handmade item such as a scarf, shawl, or even a baby blankey can serve as a heartfelt gift, or a stunning addition to your collection. As with any craft, it is a journey of discovery and skill acquisition, and the satisfaction of completing the granite lace stitch pattern makes every stitch worth the effort.

Happy Knitting,

Janice


Hi, I'm Janice, the person behind this website. I learned to knit and crochet at a very young age but didn’t get serious until obtaining this site in 2021.

Since then, I haven’t stopped creating and learning and now I’m a certified knitting and crocheting instructor through the Craft Yarn Council.

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